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Can Your Imagination Create a Stronger Team?

Posted on March 30th, 2016 Read time: 2 minutes

Do you want to build a more cohesive team? Research shows you have to start by imagining it.

  • Visualization

According to research from Harvard University’s Department of Psychology and Center for Brain Science, one minute of positive daydreaming about potential interactions among team members can have a huge, long-lasting impact. During the study, visualization about colleagues’ interactions brought more social energy, openness to out-of-the-box possibilities, and increased collaboration. As a result, anxiety was reduced, perspectives became more empathetic, the likelihood of future positive interactions increased, and work initiative-focused memory improved. Scientists believe imagining positive interactions caused a psychological shift, altering neurons subtly enough so benefits of the imagined encounters led to more realistic actions.

  • Steps

When it comes to strengthening your own team members’ interactions, go somewhere private and close your eyes. Focus your thoughts for five minutes. Be specific about the times and places of your staff members’ interactions. Imagine only desired outcomes. Remember, where your focus goes, your energy flows.  The more you think about something, the greater chance you’ll have it happen. Daydream with purpose daily to increase the incidences of colleagues’ positive interactions.

  • Performance

Just as athletes use visualization before and during a game to score points, you can focus your thoughts on positive interactions among your staff and believe they’ll happen. When Australian psychologist Alan Richardson divided basketball players into three groups, he had one group practice free throws 20 minutes daily, another visualize making free throws – but not practice, and the third not practice or visualize at all. The group that only visualized showed significant improvement and were almost as good as the group that practiced. Likewise, before pro golfer Jason Day addresses the ball each time, he stands behind it, closes his eyes, and sees his shot. After he shoots, he sees himself holding the winner’s trophy. He knows what success looks like, and he’s executing his vision. As a result, he became number four in the world ranking of golf professionals. You can use the power of visualization to build stronger interactions among your staff, as well.

Building a stronger team starts with visualizing positive interactions among colleagues. For additional help making your business more productive, contact the experts at Innovative Employee Solutions today!

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